FAQ Surrogates

Frequently Asked Questions about Surrogates

  • What expenses will be paid by the intended parents?
  • Do I get to choose the parents with whom I work?
  • What happens after I select a couple with whom to work?
  • Do I meet the parents during the surrogacy program?
  • Once my profile is distributed, how long is it before the first implantation?
  • Will I have to travel, and, if so, for how long?
  • Can I bring my husband and/or children with me if I have to travel?
  • What about daycare for my own children?
  • Will I have to take any medications?
  • Do I receive any compensation?
  • If I get pregnant, where do I deliver the baby?
  • What happens after the baby is born?
  • Can I stay in contact with the parents and the baby if I want to?

What expenses will be paid by the intended parents?

The intended parents will pay any and all reasonable and necessary expenses that you incur in connection with your surrogacy program, including, but not limited to, all uninsured medical expenses, your legal fees for evaluating and negotiating the surrogacy agreement, any and all necessary counseling expenses, child care reimbursement and lost wages.

Do I get to choose the parents with whom I work?

Yes. You will receive a brief biography from the intended parents for your review. You will then speak to them by phone with an agency program coordinator as many times as necessary for you both to feel comfortable. You may even have a face-to-face meeting with them, if all parties are willing. You then decide whether you wish to work with the prospective intended parents. If not, the agency will continue to work at matching you with other parents. The agency actively tries to match parents and surrogates who share the same general values and interests. An experienced Minneapolis & St. Paul surrogacy attorney will assist with the legal aspects of the surrogacy process.

What happens after I select a couple with whom to work?

Once you are matched with a couple, a surrogacy agreement will be drafted and reviewed by all parties. The intended parents will pay for an attorney to review the agreement with you. Once everyone has agreed to the terms of the agreement, it will be signed. The program will then begin with medical testing. Your qualified St. Paul surrogacy attorney can represent you throughout the surrogate process.

Do I meet the parents during the surrogacy program?

You may meet the parents before you agree to work with them, if you choose. Once the program has started, you and the intended parents will meet for medical appointments and at other times as you have agreed to do in your agreement. Throughout the program, the intended parents and surrogates can arrange to meet at their own discretion.

Once my profile is distributed, how long is it before the first implantation?

It usually takes 6 to 12 months to match a surrogate and prepare for the implantation.

Will I have to travel, and, if so, for how long?

You will have to travel if the clinic that the intended parents select is in a different city than the one in which you live. You will have to travel to the city in which the clinic where the procedure will be performed is located. The length of stay is usually about 5-6 days. The implantation procedure itself is very short and is typically completed in ½ an hour.

Can I bring my husband and/or children with me if I have to travel?

The intended parents pay for travel and accommodations for the surrogate only. Remember, children are not allowed in the clinics. Your spouse and children may, however, travel with you at your own expense.

What about daycare for my own children?

We typically offer a daycare allowance of $40 per day for one child and $50 per day for two or more children to cover any daycare expenses that you incur at home during your trip.

Will I have to take any medications?

When the medical testing requirements are completed and reviewed by the doctor, you will be ready to start your fertility treatment. You will receive specific instructions about your medications. You will take medications to help your cycle be synchronized with the ovum donor or wife's menstrual cycle and to help your uterine lining thicken in order to accept the transferred embryos. You will take medications both orally and through small injections under the skin that most women give themselves. Some women have their husbands or friends help them with the injections, or they go to nearby doctor's offices or clinics.

You will start progesterone vaginal suppositories on the day after the egg retrieval has occurred. You will be given a tentative date for this. This will be confirmed by IARC.

Do I receive any compensation?

You may request compensation in whatever amount you select. The amount of your requested compensation may, however, affect your desirability as a potential surrogate for certain intended parents. (Intended parents will naturally select an equivalent surrogate with a lower fee if one is available.) If you want help setting a reasonable amount of compensation, the agency will be happy to assist you. Since there are many intended parents who cannot afford to compensate a surrogate, we encourage any woman who is able and willing to be a surrogate without compensation to do so.

If I get pregnant, where do I deliver the baby?

You will deliver the baby in your home state at the hospital of your choice (with reasonable input from the intended parents).

What happens after the baby is born?

An attorney in your home state will make all the necessary legal preparations for the baby's birth. Arrangements will be made for the intended parents' contact with and control over the baby in the hospital and to whom the baby will be discharged. Some sort of court proceeding will be necessary to establish the parentage of the child as intended. The intended parents' attorney will prepare all the necessary legal paperwork at the parents' expense. You (and your spouse) may have to attend the court proceedings to terminate your parental rights and establish the parental rights of the intended parents. The exact procedure will vary depending on the state of your residence.

Can I stay in contact with the parents and the baby if I want to?

It depends on what you and the intended parents agree to. This can be discussed with the intended parents before you ever agree to work together, and we always try to match you with intended parents with similar expectations about post-birth contact.

If you have any more questions about assisted reproduction, please contact a St. Paul and Minneapolis surrogacy lawyer at our law firm now.